FAQs

Frequently asked questions..

Why is cardiovascular disease so prevalent in Canada?
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We have become a lazy country, prone to eating more than we need to survive. Recent research has uncovered that only 1 in 3 Canadians get sufficient daily exercise while our average daily intake of calories is considerably more than most of us need to survive. Obesity and diabetes are major precursors of cardiovascular disease with 62% of adults being either overweight or obese.

What percentage of HRI's income comes from government grants?
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Our state-of-the art research has enabled us to win a number of very competitive research grants. As a not-for-profit organisation, we generate the majority of our funds from the general public via our fundraising campaigns. Currently we receive about 15-20% of our income from grants. 

How does the work of our researchers impact the lives of everyday Canadians and what are HRI’s long-term goals?
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Heart disease is the world’s biggest killer, responsible for 30% of Canadian deaths annually. Better detection methods – like using ultrasound to detect atherosclerosis, a technique pioneered by the HRI’s Clinical Group – and better treatments – such as the improved stents being developed by the Translational and Immunobiology Groups – can have a huge impact on the lives of everyday Canadians, due to loved ones being spared from heart disease.

What is a legacy?
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A legacy is a gift made to The Heart Research Institute (Canada) from your Estate, through a mention in your Will. Gifts in the form of legacy to The Heart Research Institute (Canada) help accelerate the vital research projects we undertake and support new methods of preventing, detecting and treating heart disease. It is your legacy for helping future generations to enjoy a longer and more fulfilling life.

Many people, particularly those who have supported organizations during their lifetime, choose to leave legacies of varying forms and sizes to one or a number of organizations. Leaving a legacy is a way of ensuring that after you have remembered your own loved ones, you can continue to support the causes that are special to you, even after you have gone. Arranging a legacy is quite straightforward. It can be included when you first make your Will or be added to your existing Will as a codicil. Find out more

My personal information: how is my privacy protected?
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In keeping with our commitment to protect supporters’ privacy, and in the light of The Privacy Commissioners Privacy Principle Act 2006, we would like to inform you of our data handling practices. The information we collect may include contact details such as postal and email addresses, telephone number, date of birth, bank account details or credit card number and expiry date.

This information may be used by us to:

     • Process donations, lottery and raffle tickets and product purchases

     • Send receipts 

     • Send invitations to events 

     • Maintain accurate details of our supporters’ history with us

     • Keep our supporters informed of our work

     • Help us develop cost-effective marketing and fundraising activities.

All information you provide remains confidential and protected. We do not sell, rent or lease the addresses on our database to anyone for any purpose and the information will not be used in ways other than those to which you have consented.

What is The Heart Research Institute’s Charity Registration Number and address?
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Charity Registration Number: 83580 6936 RR0001

Registered Address

Heart Research Institute (CAN)
Suite 1200
350 Bay Street 
Toronto ON MSH 256

What is the difference between The Heart Research Institute (Canada) and the Heart and Stroke Foundation?
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The Heart Research Institute (Canada) is a member of The Heart Research Institute group, a centre for cutting edge scientific research, while the Heart and Stroke Foundation uses donations from the community to fund heart research, to develop guidelines for health professionals, support patient care and generally help Canadians to live healthier lifestyles.

Is cancer now Canada's and the world’s biggest killer?
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Cardiovascular disease, which encompasses heart attack and stroke, still kills more people every year than any other condition, including cancer.