Embarking on a summer holiday? Read these tips for staying active.

Health and Fitness
If you’re lucky enough to be taking a break this summer, it doesn’t mean your exercise routine needs to be kicked to the curb. A little more preparation may be required but keeping active on your holiday can be easy (and fun).

Holidays are a great time to mix up your usual routine and try new things. Once you know where you’re going be sure to research your surroundings to see what you’ve got to work with nearby. And my number one tip - write down how you plan to stay active while you’re away.

If it’s important for you to stick to your current routine make sure you’ll have access to any potential equipment you need. 

Are you staying somewhere with a gym? Is there a pool to swim laps in? Are there safe walking or running tracks nearby? But if you’re looking for different ways to keep moving then find activities you can incorporate into your day that mean you’ll be active, having fun and sightseeing, all at the same time. 

Activities you could consider on your summer holiday (destination dependent):
  • Explore local hiking tracks and trails.
  • Water activities like snorkelling, kayaking or learning to surf classes.
  • Hire bikes and spend a day exploring.
  • Play golf (just don’t hire a cart – make walking part of the fun).
  • Hire some racquets and try your hand at tennis.
  • Yoga or pilates classes are often open to taking new clients for one-off visits.
  • If you’re travelling with kids you have a perfect excuse for some outdoor running or ball games.

 

If you’re planning to take it easy you could simply start every morning with a long walk, taking a different route each day to explore your surroundings. And while it’s tempting to put your feet up altogether when you’re on holiday, remember that keeping active will help give you energy, potentially reduce stress and keep those extra holiday calories in check.

The Canadian Phyical Guidelines say adults should accumulate at least 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous intensity aerobic physical activity per week, in bouts of 10 minutes or more (and at least two days of strength activities), so keep this in mind when you’re away. But most importantly remember to pack your exercise gear, headphones and have fun!

KATE MAYHEW   

10601717_931406933563562_506929118_a.jpg Kate Mayhew is a journalist and fitness enthusiast, currently embarking on a new career in the fitness industry. She is studying a Certificate III in Fitness.
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