Professor Stuart Grieve

MBBS, DPhilOxon), FRACP, FCSANZ
“Our research focuses on the application of cutting-edge imaging technology to improve our understanding of heart function."

Over 20 years of active research, Professor Stuart Grieve has achieved a comprehensive understanding of MRI and its applications, from cellular biochemistry and physiology to MRI physics, programming and advanced image analysis techniques. Stuart completed his doctorate at the University of Oxford on the development of rapid imaging techniques in MRI and also completed postdoctoral positions using solid state NMR to study membrane-bound proteins. Following his postdoctoral studies, Professor Grieve completed medical training in Australia at The University of Sydney (2002-2005). Stuart has steadily built on this solid research foundation, using cardiac MRI to characterise heart disease and ventricular function.

Current Appointments

Cardiac Imaging Group Leader

Heart Research Institute

Parker Hughes Professor of Radiology, Sydney Medical School-Central

University of Sydney

Clinical Academic Radiologist, Department of Radiology

Royal Prince Alfred Hospital

Director of Imaging

Charles Perkins Centre, University of Sydney

Professor Stuart Grieve leads group:
Research covers areas of:
Contact Professor Stuart Grieve

More about Professor Stuart Grieve

Research Project Opportunities
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Several cardiac conditions are of interest to the group, including the looming epidemic of diabetes-related diastolic heart failure. Generally, heart failure is only clinically apparent once the disease process is advanced, leaving the clinician with limited treatment options. A major focus of the group is the development of 4-dimensional flow magnetic resonance imaging (4D-flow MRI), a unique form of MRI that measures the fluid dynamics within the heart and vessels in a quick and non-invasive way. The group is also concerned with aortic valve replacement, and are pioneering a way of predicting the likelihood of emboli by measuring the fluid sheer stress in the aorta. Another key project of the group is the study of neurogenic hypertension, high blood pressure arising from changes in the brain.

4D-flow MRI

Generally, heart failure is only clinically apparent once the disease process is advanced, leaving the clinician with limited treatment options. A major focus of the group is the development of 4-dimensional flow magnetic resonance imaging (4D-flow MRI), a unique form of MRI that measures the fluid dynamics within the heart and vessels in a quick and non-invasive way. Recent advances in technology have made 4D-flow more feasible, meaning that it can now be applied to a great range of clinical problems. “This technology is set to revolutionise not just cardiac imaging, but the daily practice of cardiology. The information that will be possible is far superior to anything that is currently available using non-invasive techniques", says Professor Grieve. 

Aortic 4D-flow & Computational fluid dynamics (CDF)

This project involves developing new translational image-based methods for better diagnosis and prognostication of aortic pathology. The aim is three-pronged:

- To provide new insights and update current approaches to aortic aneurysm; 

- To generate clinically-practical approaches that influence current practice and improve healthcare outcomes for patients with aortic disease; and

- To generate and implement commercially viable models for these approaches.

Cardiac 4D-flow & Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)

This project involves the development of novel translational image-based methods for diagnosis and prognostication of heart failure. Using an exciting new approach based on CFD analysis of 4D flow and cardiac dynamic MRI data, we hope to provide new insights to update the current approaches in the diagnosis and treatment of heart failure and generate clinically practical approaches. This has the potential to inform changes in current clinical practice and to therefore improve healthcare outcomes for patients with aortic heart failure.

Featured Publication
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Professor Grieve has published over 90 papers in the top ranking journals, including Neuroimage, Journal of Biological Psychiatry, American Journal of Neuroradiology and the European Heart Journal. As evidence of the significance of his work, he has an H-index of 29 and his published papers have generated more than 2,600 citations. 

Grieve SM, et al. Automated quantification of myocardial salvage in a rat model of ischemia-reperfusion injury using 3D high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). J AM Heart Assoc. July, 2014

Quantification of myocardial "area at risk" (AAR) and myocardial infarction (MI) zone is critical for assessing novel therapies targeting myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. Current "gold-standard" methods perfuse the heart with Evan's Blue and stain with triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC), requiring manual slicing and analysis. We aimed to develop and validate a high-resolution 3-dimensional (3D) magneticresonance imaging (MRI) method for quantifying MI and AAR. This novel, yet simple, MRI technique allows precise assessment of infarct and AAR zones. It removes the need for tissue slicing and provides opportunity for 3D digital analysis at high anatomical resolution in a streamlined manner accessible for all laboratories already performing IR experiments. Read more: jaha.ahajournals.org/content/3/4/e000956.abstract

Current Research Grants
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NHF vanguard Grants, Jan 2015,
HeadrKids Grant in Aid Dec 2014
NHMRC Project Grant, Jan 2012
 
2005     Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery – Honours, University of Sydney
2001     Post-doctoral research with Professor Tony Watts, University of Oxford
2000     Rhodes Scholarship recipient, Doctor of Philosophy, University of Oxford
1995     Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry, University of Sydney

Skills and Expertise
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Over 20 years of active research, Stuart has achieved a comprehensive understanding of MRI and its applications, from cellular biochemistry and physiology to MRI physics, programming and advanced image analysis techniques. More recently, Stuart has steadily built on this solid research foundation, using MRI to characterise heart disease and ventricular function, and to understand the neurocognitive and neurovasuclar consequences of diseases.